MALARIA AND GENDER

Women play significant roles in – and have the potential to increase contributions to – ending malaria: as community health and vector control workers, as advocates and activists, as researchers and innovators, and as leaders who ensure this is a priority for their communities, countries and the world.

This is why Malaria No More is working alongside global health and gender equity partners to explore the urgent and differentiated impacts of malaria on the rights of girls, adolescents and women.

Together, we are building an investment case that applying a more robust gender lens to the malaria fight can accelerate progress toward ending malaria and advance gender equality.

GENDER: A CRITICAL MISSING LENS IN THE MALARIA FIGHT

Malaria No More, with support from the Kati Collective, interviewed global health, malaria and gender equity leaders about the gendered dynamics of malaria. The findings are captured in this Learning Paper.

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BUILDING AN ACTION AGENDA FOR MALARIA AND GENDER ADVOCACY

Malaria and Gender Image

Malaria No More, the RBM Partnership to End Malaria and UN Women are co-convening workshops where leaders will develop advocacy, policy and programmatic solutions and build a framework for a gender-intentional advocacy and investment case for malaria.

Workshops will address adolescent girls as agents of change, research agendas, systemic and cultural barriers, economic empowerment and leadership.


Together we can:

  • Accelerate positive healthcare outcomes
  • Address the hidden gendered educational, leadership and economic costs of malaria
  • Unlock new community assets, leadership and resources

  • Accelerate progress toward malaria eradication
  • Contribute to achieving gender equality goals

PARTNERS AND COLLABORATORS

We are pleased to engage a growing coalition of partners in building a shared agenda on gender and malaria, spanning advocacy, policy and programs.

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BACKGROUND

Women and girls experience differentiated vulnerabilities to and impacts of malaria, especially during adolescence and pregnancy. Significant adverse ‘ripple-effects’ of malaria due to gendered barriers to prevention and treatment as well as unpaid care-giving for family members with malaria may compromise their schooling, economic empowerment, maturation and life choices, as well as their potential for community engagement and leadership. These hidden gendered impacts underscore and strengthen the urgency and value of malaria eradication.

GET IN TOUCH

To learn more about global and MNM efforts to end malaria, please reach out.